Cavache-MAYA CAELYN 1170

Little Known Ways to Nourish a Coastline

Ponce de Leon Inlet, FL– Crews have been granted permission by the U.S. Army Corps of Army Engineers (USACE) to begin dredging on the Ponce de Leon Inlet.  This should make it more secure for anglers to navigate. In addition, the dredging will offer additional beach nourishment for the nearby coastline. The Inlet itself has not been maintained to this extent in over ten years according to the Corps officials.

Those working on the project have already begun the mobilization phase of the eight-month-long hydraulic dredging project.  In fact, crew members working on the project are expected to remove nearly 38,000 ft² (3,530 m²) of sand and debris. The dredging should increase water depths to nearly 12 ft (3.65 m). The USACE is financing the and has awarded Cavache (Incorporated) of Pompano Beach the contract.

What’s in a Dredge

The team from Cavache Inc,  (owned and operated by Mr. Adam Adache and Mr. Anthony Cavo), has over 100 years of combined hydraulic dredging experience.  They have previously worked on similar types of projects such as the Florida Inland District project. The team from Cavache will be using an Ellicott 1170 “Dragon” dredge known as the “Maya Caelyn” to complete the project.

The portable cutterhead dredge is a medium sized dredge that is designed to perform exceptionally well in typical conditions experienced in Atlantic inlets, and entrance channels from the Sea to inner coastal waterways.

Ponce de Leon Project Details

“What is really unique about this specific project is that this is an offshore disposal placement project that requires pumping material offshore. The pumping distances are fairly lengthy, and our team is using multiple boosters to complete the project,” noted Cavache Principle Owner Anthony Cavo.

Debris and sand that accumulated during Hurricanes Irma and Matthew caused aggressive shoaling.  Also, the materials caused by the shoaling will be pumped from the Ponce de Leon Inlet.  The materials will then be transported to a nearby location and used to help nourish area beaches.  Once the dredging process is complete the flow of water will drastically improve in the nearby region. Dredging the inlet should bolster the shoreline during subsequent storms making it simple for vessels to freely move about the inlet.

Ellicott 1270 Dragon Dredge

Ellicott Builds 1270 Dredge for West African Based Oil Company for Channel Dredging -Ellicott Dredges

Ellicott Dredges, the Baltimore-based dredge manufacturer with over 133 years of experience, recently built a Series 1270 “Dragon®” dredge for an oil company in West Africa. The dredge recently launched and will be used for channel dredging in swamp regions. The customer has worked with our team before and owns two Series 670 “Dragon®” dredges and appreciates the simplicity of the dredges operating systems, rugged design and high performance.

Ellicott was awarded the contract based on the customers’ interest in the 1270’s shallow dredging optimization feature that is built into Ellicott’s 16 – 20 inch dredges, with an option to adjust the dredges ladder to a maximum digging depth of 50 ft (15.2 m). This is feature is extremely appealing to the customer because there are times when they will have to transition to a land reclamation project that requires efficient work productivity in both shallow and deep working conditions.

The portable cutterhead dredge includes two diesel engines that enables the operator to adjust both the cutter and slurry pump power separately to efficiently meet West Africa’s varying working conditions and yield maximum production rates. The 1270 also includes wide pontoons offering optimum stability and additional workspace for crew members working below and on deck.

Why Dredging Sea Dog Creek Was Necessary - Ellicott Dredges

Why Dredging Sea Dog Creek Is Necessary

Anglers navigating Sea Dog Creek near the Town of Hempstead, New York, are now able to safely travel the creek with relative ease in shallow areas this summer; however, this hasn’t always been the case. In 2012, clogged floodwaters created by Superstorm Sandy made it almost virtually impossible for large commercial vessels to navigate charted waters between the eastern end of Sea Dog Creek and nearby Long Creek.

Recently local workers from the Department of Conservation and Waterways used an Ellicott 460SL “Swinging Dragon®” dredge, known as the “Hempstead Bays” to remove 8,000 cubic yds³ (6,116 m³) of sand from nearby Sea Dog Creek. The swinging ladder dredge was purchased by the Town of Hempstead from dredge manufacturer Ellicott Dredges in 2008. Crews used the dredge to remove sand and water to dig down to approximately 12 ft (3.6 m).

One of the many challenges the crew faced during the dredging process included working within very short dredging windows. In addition, they were not allowed to use clean sand within the boundaries of regulated title zones. Despite some limitations, crews were able to overcome these obstacles to complete the project over the course of two weeks

Impact of Hurricane Sandy

There is little doubt that Hurricane Sandy had a tremendous impact on the local region. In fact, when flooded waters swept through the local area, it created a shoal near the eastern end of Sea Dog Creek causing it to clog making virtually impossible for casual boaters to navigate the creek.

Conservation Biologist Dr. James Browne noted that Hurricane Sandy had a tremendous influence on the formation of a sandbar causing the waterway to clog.

“Simply put, was sand stirred up along the beaches, and ebb shoal bar. The materials were then pulled into the bay during the storm surge. The sand was then deposited at some locations which slowed the flow of water. When conditions returned to normal, there was very little to no water in some of the channels.  Traditionally some of these areas range from 4 to 6 ft. in depth. The minimized water levels were then exposed causing a sandbar to form at extreme low tides. This made it hard to navigate a vessel without water underneath of its keel,” noted Dr. James Browne.

The Environmental Impact On Sea Dog Creek

Sea Dog Creek is the only inland waterway route for vessels to navigate north of the fixed bridge close to nearby Point Lookout. The recent improvements now make it easier for commercial boats to travel freely. However, a more pressing problem includes making better use of clean materials that include the enhancement of salt marsh projects.

Hempstead council members were unable to obtain marsh restoration on the emergency permit granted to them by the NYSDEC. Additional funding is being sought for future marsh restoration work sourcing material from Sea Dog State marshes and shoals. The hope is that the additional work will reduce flooding during future storms.

Almost every channel in the surrounding region remains clogged. Therefore additional dredging is required to keep waterways clear. Thankfully, the Town of Hempstead has the necessary dredging equipment in-house to address environmental disasters. This keeps recovery costs reasonably low should an unfortunate incident occur in the future that impacts nearby waterways.

The NYSDEC Funds Sea Dog Restoration Project

A group of officials representing the Town of Hampstead led by Councilman Timothy D’ Esposito asked the NYSDEC to accelerate the necessary dredging permit process after several vessels ran aground due to shallow water conditions.

Town officials needed a state waiver from the NYSDEC to begin dredging in state intercoastal waterways. That’s because this is typically the time of year when spawning season starts for flounder fish.

Thanks to the help of the NYSDEC the Town of Hempstead Department of Conservation and Waterways was granted a 10-year dredge permit to maintain Sea Dog Creek.

The entire operation was completed under an approved emergency permit issued by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC.) Councilman D’Esposito noted, “Our biggest challenge was obtaining the necessary permits that were needed to begin the Sea Dog Creek restoration project.”

Hempstead town officials are now planning to start additional dredging projects slated to begin in the fall of 2018.

 

customized dredge. .

What It Takes to Build a Customized Dredge

In 2017, a petrochemical customer approached Ellicott Dredges about building a customized electric Bucketwheel dredge. The customized dredge had to be designed to withstand desert-like conditions.  The customer chose Ellicott Dredges based upon Ellicott’s experience and reputation for designing and building dredges to work in difficult and challenging environments.

Discovering the Solution to a Challenging Problem

The most significant challenge facing the team from Ellicott was the ability to transport a 1MM lb. (453,592.3 kg) dredge halfway around the world. During the beginning stages of the project, a team from Ellicott’s Major Projects division sprang into action and discovered a solution to the problem. Thanks to some creative thinking, they decided to design and build a dredge that was capable of being disassembled, easily transported over road and sea, and reassembled at the customer’s project site.

What Makes This Customized Dredge Different?

The new customized dredge is equipped with Ellicott’s patented Dual-Wheel Excavator (DWE) 94 600HP cutter engine.  In fact, a traditional DWE 94 model dredge has a 150HP cutter engine.  However, this specific dredge produces four times the power.

The dredge will spend most of its time in a salt pond pumping salt and brine. It’s important to realize that the first few feet of water consists mostly of sand. This part of the process is easy to manage. However, beneath the sand is a deposit of halite mineral that contains nearly 90% pure salt. In fact, the mineral is hard and requires increased power from a dredge that comes with a dual wheel excavator. This makes it possible to continue pumping salt and brine.

Due to the nature of work that’s involved the equipment onboard the dredge is suitable for a highly corrosive environment. Optional items installed on the dredge include:

  • Bolt-on-zinc-anodes that can be changed out from the deck.
  • Radiators that cool hydraulic fluid.
  • Stainless piping and fasteners.

Final Stages of the Project

After spending several months assembling the customized electric Bucketwheel dredge and undergoing testing, the team from Ellicott Dredges is proud to announce that the final stages of construction are now complete.

In May, a crew from Ellicott Dredges completed disassembly of the dredge. Various dredge sections and components were shipped breakbulk and crated in containers and then placed on a vessel that set sail for delivery from the Port of Baltimore. In addition, Ellicott’s team of experienced field service engineers will be available on site to assist the customer with the assembly of the dredge and training of their crew.

 

Malawi Customers Receive Dredging Education

Ellicott Dredges Hosts EGENCO Dredge Training

Ellicott Dredges recently hosted a team of officials from Malawi’s Electricity Generation Company (EGENCO, LTD). During their two week visit, our distinguished guests participated in dredge operation, engine care, hydraulic control systems, and other dredge training programs that prepared them to independently operate a dredge that Ellicott Dredges is currently building for them.

Malawi’s Newest Dredge

Ellicott Dredges is building a Dragon® Series model 1270 18-inch dredge for EGENCO under contract from the Millennium Challenge Account-Malawi. During their visit, our guests got to see the dredge in the final stages of preparation.

The 1270 Dragon® dredger is configured for shallow digging and outfitted with a spud carriage that’s designed to increase efficiency. The dredge is intended to maintain the Kapichira Hydroelectric Plant on the Shire River. The vessel will dramatically improve EGENCO’s output and better meet Malawi’s power needs.

Blocked Water Channel

Getting Rid of a Blocked Water Channel Once and For All

Tilghman Island Rich History

Tilghman Island is nestled in the heart of Talbot County, Maryland. Formerly referred to as the “Great Choptank Island,” the island is only 3 miles long (4.83 kms) and a 1 mile (1.60 kms) wide.  According to historians, the first English settlers arrived over 360 years ago in 1656.

During the early 19th century, two parcels of land were sold to a group of oysterman. The group wanted the land for its close proximity to the prime harvesting grounds that surround Tilghman Island.  Today, over 1,000 thousand residents live on the island. A majority of the residence make their living by crabbing, fishing, and oyster or seafood packing.

Tilghman Island Worst Nightmare – A Blocked Water Channel

Throughout the its recent history, severe thunderstorms and eroding waterways have caused sediment, clay, mud, silt, sand, and shells to build up, blocking  the Knapps Narrows access channel to the Choptank River. Consequently, the Knapps not only shortens the route around the end of the island by over five miles (8kms), it is the home port for dozens of fishing and crabbing vessels. In some locations, depths have been reported as low as a 1 foot (0.30m) during low tide.

The blocked channel is preventing Tilghman Island businesses from thriving.  Several business owners have lost nearly 50 percent of their business.  Ron Cicero, the owner of Tilghman Island Marina and Rentals, said that the impact has been felt by everyone. “Restaurants and tourism on the island have declined dramatically over the years.” Cicero also added that boaters and tourists  are staying away from the island because of the blocked channel.  With so many declining businesses struggling to survive the local economy has suffered.  As a result, residents took matters into their own hands, and started searching for answers to their problems several months ago.

WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 –

Solution to the Problem—Hydraulic Dredging

Residence can now breathe a sigh of relief. The US Army Corp of Engineers in conjunction with various branches of the Federal Government, Maryland State Government, Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Talbot County government have agreed to allow crews to dredge approximately 100,000 cubic yd3 (914,40 m3) of material.

Workers are using an Ellicott Series 970 Dragon Dredge to clear the channel. The Hydraulic dredge is ideal for this specific job.  To summarize things, the dredeges’ cutterhead  will remove the debris found in the river.  The dredge will then pump the discharge efficiently to a distant location. In fact, we are already a week into dredging, and crews have dropped a blue pipeline on the west side of the Choptank River. Now the dredges are sucking up dirt and water – pumping it out of the river to a nearby farm.

The project is expected to cost approximately $1.4 million and will be done by Memorial Day weekend.

Sand Shifter

Who Else Wants a Cool Custom-Built Dredge?

Residents of Barnstable County, Massachusetts waited patiently for the newly minted Sand Shifter Dredge to arrive.  Well their wait is finally over. The brand new $2 million dredge built by Ellicott Dredges of Maryland has  finally reached Falmouth Harbor. Everyone is really excited about the project. In fact, harbor officials are ready to unveil their brand new aquatic masterpiece to the general public.

The Sand Shifter to Undergo One Final Test

A team of representatives from Ellicott Dredges are performing preliminary tests this week.  Our team is working around the clock to make sure that everything is in working  order before turning possession of the dredge over to county officials.

“They (Ellicott) have been awesome to work with,” said interim Assistant County Administrator Stephen Tebo, while speaking to reporters last week. Tebo, explained  the complex details of the work involved when constructing a custom-built dredge.  The Sand Shifter is a one of kind vessel that requires immense attention to detail.

Why the Sand Shifter is Severely Needed

Falmouth Harbor was built in 1907, when an inlet was sliced in the barrier beach to separate freshwater Deacon’s Pond from Nantucket Sound. Falmouth Harbor an ideal fishing spot for the casual angler. However, because the port is  used throughout the year, county commissioners voted to build a second dredge to pair with the Codfish. The Codfish, is an older Ellicott Series 670 Dragon dredge. Until recently  it was the only dredge used to maintain  Falmouth Harbor.

A second dredge is desperately needed because of the amount of work that occurs throughout the year. However, some projects can be potentially  delayed on occasion causing work to backup.  Initial plans include using both the Sand Shifter and Codfish to maintain Falmouth Harbor.  For now, each dredge will be positioned on both sides of the harbor, That is unless business increases, and projects begin to pile up,

The Sand Shifter will see its first action in less than two weeks. Discussions have centered around using the vessel to help clean up the Eel River in the nearby Cape Cod area.

State of the Art Technology

Stephen Bradbury, captain of the Sand Shifter, applauded the dredge’s new features and advanced technology while taking a stroll along the vessel with reporters. “It’s a completely new design,” he said comparing it with its predecessor, the Codfish.

The Sand Shifter possesses greater fuel efficiency. In addition, the vessel can  pump sediment at greater distances  The dredge also digs deeper and wider, allowing it to finish projects faster, Bradbury said.

How To Get Rid of Muck

The Initial Project

At one time, over 4 million gallons (1,514 million liters) of toxic semi-treated sewage flowed into Palm Bay Florida’s Turkey Creek. As a result, Turkey Creek contained extremely high levels of harmful toxins and nutrients.

During the spring of 2017, the team from Gator Dredging spent most of their time focused on cleaning up the mess that once occupied Turkey Creek, removing over 236,000 yd3 (180,435 m3) of muck, nitrogen, and phosphorus contamination.

The Right Kind of Equipment

When working on a project the size of Turkey Creek, you need the right kind of equipment. For this project, an Ellicott Series 670 Dragon®  dredge was selected. The 670 is capable of digging as deep as 42 feet (13.0 m) and contains a sizeable pump with a lot of horsepower that’s needed to complete a job of this magnitude. The Series 670 Dragon® dredge is known as a dependable, reliable, and top-notch piece of machinery with an excellent reputation.

The initial Turkey Creek cleanup took several months to complete, but as the project was drawing to a close, all of the parties that were impacted by the initial cleanup thought that their work was nearly complete. However, little did they know that a natural disaster was just around the corner that would negate all of their prior hard work and effort.

 

Hurricane Irma

On September 11, 2017, Hurricane Irma hit the Gulf Coast of Florida, causing significant flooding in the nearby Turkey Creek community located close to Gainesville. For the second time in less than two years, the harmful muck that had previously existed in Turkey Creek once again infiltrated the body of water and had to be cleaned up.  This time, the team from Gator Dredging was asked to remove organic muck that could now be found underneath docks located in shallow areas and filling deep holes throughout the surrounding Turkey Creek area that had been impacted by damage from the storm.

Two of the most significant challenges facing the team from Gator Dredge during the cleanup process this time included managing materials and controlling the return of water.  That’s because, for nearly five decades, local and state officials ignored the condition of the creek, the impact that the muck had on the health of residents, and its impact on the surrounding habitat.

Why Dredging?

Dredging is the foundation of most aquatic projects and addresses a wide range of the world’s financial, social, and environmental needs. With more than 50 percent of the world’s population living inside of a 125 miles (201 km) radius of a significant coastline, low lying areas like Turkey Creek are in jeopardy of severe flooding and require constant improvements along and near its shoreline.

Aquatic areas similar to Turkey Creek have experienced rising water levels caused by powerful storms such as Hurricane Irma. The results include property damage for hundreds of homeowners impacted by deadly hurricanes, and it also affects the surrounding habitat causing millions of dollars in damage if left untreated.

So why is dredging important? When a body of water is dredged, there is a less likely chance of shore erosion occurring, and the surrounding habitat is restored. Several forms of sediment contain toxins from industrial runoff that significantly impact the water quality.

When any type of debris that contains pollutants are removed, the overall health of a body of water improves.

Dragas Ellicott en Latinoamérica – Décadas de Calidad y Durabilidad

Las dragas Ellicott son conocidas por ser las más robustas y durables del mercado. Los dragadores más experimentados las prefieren porque saben que pueden contar con ellas para trabajar en las condiciones más difíciles y por muchos años.

En Latinoamérica Ellicott tiene una fuerte presencia desde hace más de 100 años. Un número importante de nuestras dragas viene operando desde hace varias décadas, realizando trabajos críticos de dragado.

Draga Ellicott – ANNP (Paraguay)

En Paraguay, una draga Ellicott modelo 1680, con bomba de 20” fue adquirida por la Administración Nacional de Navegación y Puertos de Paraguay (ANNP) en 1993 para realizar mantenimiento de puertos en el rio Paraguay. Este rio es la principal arteria comercial del país. 24 años después, la draga Ellicott sigue siendo parte vital de la flota de la ANNP, realizando hoy en día trabajos de dragado de mantenimiento portuario.

En Brasil, una draga Ellicott de 14” fabricada en 1968 continúa actualmente, casi 50 años después, realizando de manera confiable trabajos críticos de manejo de relaves mineros para la empresa minera Vale.

Draga Ellicott – Cormagdalena (Colombia)

En Colombia, la entidad gubernamental CORMAGDALENA, la cual tiene como misión la administración del rio Magdalena, posee una draga Ellicott modelo 1170 de 16”. Esta draga viene utilizándose desde el 2009, en muchos casos como herramienta única para garantizar la navegabilidad comercial en ciertos puntos críticos del rio. El rio Magdalena es considerado la vía más importante para el transporte de materias primas desde el centro del país hacia la costa colombiana.

Draga Ellicott – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 1927

Ellicott tiene una red de representantes autorizados en todo Latinoamérica. Ya sea directamente o a través de ellos, estamos listos para apoyarlo en cualquier proyecto de dragado.

Ellicott Swinging Dragon Busy in Indiana

Superior Dredging of Illinois has announced that their Fall 2017 dredge projects on Jimmerson Lake, Indiana, are underway.

The work, conducted by their brand new Ellicott Swinging Dragon Dredge Jenny-Kay, started at Site 1 by the dam on West Bachelor Road last week. It will continue its work on the channel towards the east. This area is expected to take 3 weeks to complete.

From there, work will move down to the south end of the lake for three separate projects. Next up, will be the nearly silted in channel along Lane 101D referred to as Site 8. From there, the Site 7 channel fronting the Jimmerson Bluffs area along Lane 205AA will be restored.

The final project will be restoring the area in front of the Hilltop Park subdivision.

With over 25,000 cubic yards of sediment to be removed at the 4 different locations on the lake. Work is expected to last six to seven weeks and will continue every day until complete.

The Site 1 & 7 projects were made possible through a majority funding via the Indiana DNR and their Lake and River Enhancement (LARE) program, along with a 20% contribution from the Jimmerson Lake Association.

The Site 8 and Hilltop Park projects, are being privately funded by their respective group of homeowners.

 

Source: DredgingToday