Blocked Water Channel

Getting Rid of a Blocked Water Channel Once and For All

Tilghman Island Rich History

Tilghman Island is nestled in the heart of Talbot County, Maryland. Formerly referred to as the “Great Choptank Island,” the island is only 3 miles long (4.83 kms) and a 1 mile (1.60 kms) wide.  According to historians, the first English settlers arrived over 360 years ago in 1656.

During the early 19th century, two parcels of land were sold to a group of oysterman. The group wanted the land for its close proximity to the prime harvesting grounds that surround Tilghman Island.  Today, over 1,000 thousand residents live on the island. A majority of the residence make their living by crabbing, fishing, and oyster or seafood packing.

Tilghman Island Worst Nightmare – A Blocked Water Channel

Throughout the its recent history, severe thunderstorms and eroding waterways have caused sediment, clay, mud, silt, sand, and shells to build up, blocking  the Knapps Narrows access channel to the Choptank River. Consequently, the Knapps not only shortens the route around the end of the island by over five miles (8kms), it is the home port for dozens of fishing and crabbing vessels. In some locations, depths have been reported as low as a 1 foot (0.30m) during low tide.

The blocked channel is preventing Tilghman Island businesses from thriving.  Several business owners have lost nearly 50 percent of their business.  Ron Cicero, the owner of Tilghman Island Marina and Rentals, said that the impact has been felt by everyone. “Restaurants and tourism on the island have declined dramatically over the years.” Cicero also added that boaters and tourists  are staying away from the island because of the blocked channel.  With so many declining businesses struggling to survive the local economy has suffered.  As a result, residents took matters into their own hands, and started searching for answers to their problems several months ago.

WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 –

Solution to the Problem—Hydraulic Dredging

Residence can now breathe a sigh of relief. The US Army Corp of Engineers in conjunction with various branches of the Federal Government, Maryland State Government, Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Talbot County government have agreed to allow crews to dredge approximately 100,000 cubic yd3 (914,40 m3) of material.

Workers are using an Ellicott Series 970 Dragon Dredge to clear the channel. The Hydraulic dredge is ideal for this specific job.  To summarize things, the dredeges’ cutterhead  will remove the debris found in the river.  The dredge will then pump the discharge efficiently to a distant location. In fact, we are already a week into dredging, and crews have dropped a blue pipeline on the west side of the Choptank River. Now the dredges are sucking up dirt and water – pumping it out of the river to a nearby farm.

The project is expected to cost approximately $1.4 million and will be done by Memorial Day weekend.

Sand Shifter

Who Else Wants a Cool Custom-Built Dredge

Residents of Barnstable County, Massachusetts waited patiently for the newly minted Sand Shifter Dredge to arrive.  Well their wait is finally over. The brand new $2 million dredge built by Ellicott Dredges of Maryland has  finally reached Falmouth Harbor. Everyone is really excited about the project. In fact, harbor officials are ready to unveil their brand new aquatic masterpiece to the general public.

The Sand Shifter to Undergo One Final Test

A team of representatives from Ellicott Dredges are performing preliminary tests this week.  Our team is working around the clock to make sure that everything is in working  order before turning possession of the dredge over to county officials.

“They (Ellicott) have been awesome to work with,” said interim Assistant County Administrator Stephen Tebo, while speaking to reporters last week. Tebo, explained  the complex details of the work involved when constructing a custom-built dredge.  The Sand Shifter is a one of kind vessel that requires immense attention to detail.

Why the Sand Shifter is Severely Needed

Falmouth Harbor was built in 1907, when an inlet was sliced in the barrier beach to separate freshwater Deacon’s Pond from Nantucket Sound. Falmouth Harbor an ideal fishing spot for the casual angler. However, because the port is  used throughout the year, county commissioners voted to build a second dredge to pair with the Codfish. The Codfish, is an older Ellicott Series 670 Dragon dredge. Until recently  it was the only dredge used to maintain  Falmouth Harbor.

A second dredge is desperately needed because of the amount of work that occurs throughout the year. However, some projects can be potentially  delayed on occasion causing work to backup.  Initial plans include using both the Sand Shifter and Codfish to maintain Falmouth Harbor.  For now, each dredge will be positioned on both sides of the harbor, That is unless business increases, and projects begin to pile up,

The Sand Shifter will see its first action in less than two weeks. Discussions have centered around using the vessel to help clean up the Eel River in the nearby Cape Cod area.

State of the Art Technology

Stephen Bradbury, captain of the Sand Shifter, applauded the dredge’s new features and advanced technology while taking a stroll along the vessel with reporters. “It’s a completely new design,” he said comparing it with its predecessor, the Codfish.

The Sand Shifter possesses greater fuel efficiency. In addition, the vessel can  pump sediment at greater distances  The dredge also digs deeper and wider, allowing it to finish projects faster, Bradbury said.

How To Get Rid of Muck

The Initial Project

At one time, over 4 million gallons (1,514 million liters) of toxic semi-treated sewage flowed into Palm Bay Florida’s Turkey Creek. As a result, Turkey Creek contained extremely high levels of harmful toxins and nutrients.

During the spring of 2017, the team from Gator Dredging spent most of their time focused on cleaning up the mess that once occupied Turkey Creek, removing over 236,000 yd3 (180,435 m3) of muck, nitrogen, and phosphorus contamination.

The Right Kind of Equipment

When working on a project the size of Turkey Creek, you need the right kind of equipment. For this project, an Ellicott Series 670 Dragon®  dredge was selected. The 670 is capable of digging as deep as 42 feet (13.0 m) and contains a sizeable pump with a lot of horsepower that’s needed to complete a job of this magnitude. The Series 670 Dragon® dredge is known as a dependable, reliable, and top-notch piece of machinery with an excellent reputation.

The initial Turkey Creek cleanup took several months to complete, but as the project was drawing to a close, all of the parties that were impacted by the initial cleanup thought that their work was nearly complete. However, little did they know that a natural disaster was just around the corner that would negate all of their prior hard work and effort.

 

Hurricane Irma

On September 11, 2017, Hurricane Irma hit the Gulf Coast of Florida, causing significant flooding in the nearby Turkey Creek community located close to Gainesville. For the second time in less than two years, the harmful muck that had previously existed in Turkey Creek once again infiltrated the body of water and had to be cleaned up.  This time, the team from Gator Dredging was asked to remove organic muck that could now be found underneath docks located in shallow areas and filling deep holes throughout the surrounding Turkey Creek area that had been impacted by damage from the storm.

Two of the most significant challenges facing the team from Gator Dredge during the cleanup process this time included managing materials and controlling the return of water.  That’s because, for nearly five decades, local and state officials ignored the condition of the creek, the impact that the muck had on the health of residents, and its impact on the surrounding habitat.

Why Dredging?

Dredging is the foundation of most aquatic projects and addresses a wide range of the world’s financial, social, and environmental needs. With more than 50 percent of the world’s population living inside of a 125 miles (201 km) radius of a significant coastline, low lying areas like Turkey Creek are in jeopardy of severe flooding and require constant improvements along and near its shoreline.

Aquatic areas similar to Turkey Creek have experienced rising water levels caused by powerful storms such as Hurricane Irma. The results include property damage for hundreds of homeowners impacted by deadly hurricanes, and it also affects the surrounding habitat causing millions of dollars in damage if left untreated.

So why is dredging important? When a body of water is dredged, there is a less likely chance of shore erosion occurring, and the surrounding habitat is restored. Several forms of sediment contain toxins from industrial runoff that significantly impact the water quality.

When any type of debris that contains pollutants are removed, the overall health of a body of water improves.

Dragas Ellicott en Latinoamérica – Décadas de Calidad y Durabilidad

Las dragas Ellicott son conocidas por ser las más robustas y durables del mercado. Los dragadores más experimentados las prefieren porque saben que pueden contar con ellas para trabajar en las condiciones más difíciles y por muchos años.

En Latinoamérica Ellicott tiene una fuerte presencia desde hace más de 100 años. Un número importante de nuestras dragas viene operando desde hace varias décadas, realizando trabajos críticos de dragado.

Draga Ellicott – ANNP (Paraguay)

En Paraguay, una draga Ellicott modelo 1680, con bomba de 20” fue adquirida por la Administración Nacional de Navegación y Puertos de Paraguay (ANNP) en 1993 para realizar mantenimiento de puertos en el rio Paraguay. Este rio es la principal arteria comercial del país. 24 años después, la draga Ellicott sigue siendo parte vital de la flota de la ANNP, realizando hoy en día trabajos de dragado de mantenimiento portuario.

En Brasil, una draga Ellicott de 14” fabricada en 1968 continúa actualmente, casi 50 años después, realizando de manera confiable trabajos críticos de manejo de relaves mineros para la empresa minera Vale.

Draga Ellicott – Cormagdalena (Colombia)

En Colombia, la entidad gubernamental CORMAGDALENA, la cual tiene como misión la administración del rio Magdalena, posee una draga Ellicott modelo 1170 de 16”. Esta draga viene utilizándose desde el 2009, en muchos casos como herramienta única para garantizar la navegabilidad comercial en ciertos puntos críticos del rio. El rio Magdalena es considerado la vía más importante para el transporte de materias primas desde el centro del país hacia la costa colombiana.

Draga Ellicott – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 1927

Ellicott tiene una red de representantes autorizados en todo Latinoamérica. Ya sea directamente o a través de ellos, estamos listos para apoyarlo en cualquier proyecto de dragado.

Ellicott Swinging Dragon Busy in Indiana

Superior Dredging of Illinois has announced that their Fall 2017 dredge projects on Jimmerson Lake, Indiana, are underway.

The work, conducted by their brand new Ellicott Swinging Dragon Dredge Jenny-Kay, started at Site 1 by the dam on West Bachelor Road last week. It will continue its work on the channel towards the east. This area is expected to take 3 weeks to complete.

From there, work will move down to the south end of the lake for three separate projects. Next up, will be the nearly silted in channel along Lane 101D referred to as Site 8. From there, the Site 7 channel fronting the Jimmerson Bluffs area along Lane 205AA will be restored.

The final project will be restoring the area in front of the Hilltop Park subdivision.

With over 25,000 cubic yards of sediment to be removed at the 4 different locations on the lake. Work is expected to last six to seven weeks and will continue every day until complete.

The Site 1 & 7 projects were made possible through a majority funding via the Indiana DNR and their Lake and River Enhancement (LARE) program, along with a 20% contribution from the Jimmerson Lake Association.

The Site 8 and Hilltop Park projects, are being privately funded by their respective group of homeowners.

 

Source: DredgingToday

Barnstable County Wants You to Name Their New Dredge

The Barnstable County Dredge Program has launched a campaign giving the public the opportunity to pick the name of their newest dredge.

Photo: barnstablecounty.org

The Ellicott vessel is currently under construction in Baltimore, Maryland and is expected to make its way to the cape sometime next month.

Interim Assistant County Administrator Stephen Tebo explained the decision.

“We figured we would bring it back to the residents of Barnstable County to have a fun campaign to see if we can name, and rather than just have us pick a name for it we figured it would be good bring some awareness of what the dredge actually does for the county, and the towns within the county.”

The county already operates a 20-year-old Ellicott dredge, dubbed “Cod Fish” which has served the double-purpose. First, the service aids Cape towns in dredging projects at approximately 70 percent below market rate, allowing mariners to more easily navigate channels by widening waterways.

Secondly, the county dredging program also uses all of the dredged material for various beach replenishment projects across the county, saving towns money on what can be a very expensive prospect.

The new, yet unnamed, vessel is larger and more powerful than the “Cod Fish” and as a result is expected to allow a much more responsive dredge schedule, in order to better meet the needs of the community.

The dredge naming campaign will occur in two phases: During the first phase, the public can submit a name from now until August 21st at barnstablecounty.org.

Tebo is urging the public to be creative, just not too creative.

“Try to keep it on a Cape theme also, there was a story a few years back where they actually named a boat ‘McShippy’ because that was one of the big, you know ‘McDreamy’ and those type of things were out there, so we want to keep some guidelines on what it would actually end up being named.”

A select committee at Barnstable County will then narrow submissions down to the top ten, and during the second phase, the public will be able to vote on those top ten names from August 23nd to August 31st.

The winner will be announced on the Barnstable County website on September 1st.

“Operating in one of the world’s most sensitive ecological environments – we’re looking for a name that equally exemplifies the work Barnstable County Dredge does to maintain the health of our region and a name that is specifically related to Cape Cod,” said Leo Cakounes, Chairman of the Barnstable County Commissioners, “This campaign will give everyone on Cape Cod the opportunity to feel part of this important project that will have a critical and positive impact on our environment.”

Source: DredgeWire

State of Ohio Dredge Fleet Sets Performance Record

OHIO, USA – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) recently finished the 2016 dredging season, having removed more than 1 million cubic yards (apprx. 765,000 m3) of dredged material from state park lakes and other state properties. The State’s dredge fleet consists primarily of Ellicott Model 460SL swinging ladder dredges.

The 1 million cubic yards of sediment is the most that has ever been removed in the history of the state’s dredging program.

Ellicott 460SL dredge, “BRUTUS”

ODNR Director, James Zehringer, attributes ODNR’s dredging success to the dedicated staff and the strategic use of available resources, which serves to improve boater access and water quality.

“ODNR remains committed to improving access to Ohio’s lakes and understands the vital role healthy waters play in all of Ohio’s communities,” Zehringer said. “Our comprehensive approach to dredging utilizes personnel and equipment in a manner that helps create safer waterways for boaters while working to provide cleaner lakes for Ohioans.”

Ellicott 460SL Swinging Ladder Dredge, “CHIEF”, with 1965 Ellicott dredge, “INDIAN”, in the background

In 2016, ODNR and private groups worked together to excavate and remove sediment from navigable waterways, including Buckeye Lake, Grand Lake St. Marys and Indian Lake. This practice increases navigability and water quality by removing phosphorus-rich sediment and increasing water depth.

ODNR dredgers removed enough material from Ohio’s lakes this year to fill 67,431 dump trucks, and if those dump trucks were lined up bumper to bumper, they would stretch 319 miles.

“CONFLUENCE”, another 460SL dredge

Buckeye Lake had a record year of dredging with 293,228 cubic yards being removed, which beat the 2015 record of 139,000 cubic yards. Grand Lake St. Marys also experienced a record-breaking year for removing dredged material by taking out 405,523 cubic yards of sediment, exceeding the 2015 record of 364,590 cubic yards.

Indian Lake removed 100,054 cubic yards of dredged material, also beating the 2015 record of 90,405 cubic yards. The area will likely see another increase next year, as Indian Lake will add another dredge during the 2017 season, ODNR said.

Other dredging sites included East Harbor, Findley, Lake Loramie and Rocky Fork state parks.

The next dredging season will begin in April 2017.

Source: ODNR

Ellicott Hosts Baltimore City Middle School Student Progam

On July 14, Ellicott hosted a field trip for Baltimore City middle school students in conjunction with Morgan State University’s summer program, which introduces young students to computer aided design (CAD).

Baltimore City middle school students at Ellicott’s manufacturing facility.

Associate Professor J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias, Ph.D., Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and her colleague LaDawn Partlow, visited Ellicott along with student mentors as part of the Verizon Innovative Learning Program for Minority Males.

Paul Quinn, VP Sales, introduced the students to dredges, explaining what they do and how they operate. The presentation and brief video enabled the students to later identify parts of the dredge, such as the cutter, as they toured the manufacturing yard.

After a group photo (in front of an Ellicott 670 dredge prepped for shipment), the students broke into small groups and rotated through six stations: Manufacturing Yard, Main Shop, Office Tour – Historical, Dredge Simulator, Solidworks 3D-Drafting Techniques, and FEMAP/Structural Analysis.

The tour and demos were instrumental in engaging the students to see the correlation between 3D modeling and fabrication. Dr. Ladeji-Osias noted the field trip gave the students an opportunity to learn more about potential careers in engineering and drafting.

Ellicott Wins Three Government Contracts in the U.S.

USA – Ellicott Dredges is pleased to announce that they were recently awarded three significant contracts with the U.S. government.

The first contract is for a customized Ellicott 860SL Swinging Dragon® dredge and support boat

Ellicott 860SL Swinging Ladder Dredge

Ellicott 860SL Swinging Ladder Dredge

for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). This dredge will be used to increase depth and restore water flow in the Colorado River, and to create wetland habitats. One of the primary objectives of this program is multi-species conservation, including birds, fish, turtles, insects, and plants.

Ellicott has already supplied multiple dredges to the USBR for the Colorado River management project.

860SL Swinging Dragon Specs

Barnstable County

Ellicott designed a new dredge – the 14” Bay Dragon – for Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

Ellicott’s new Bay Dragon Series

Ellicott’s new Bay Dragon Series

The Bay Dragon® series is a modernized line of Ellicott’s 10-20” portable cutter suction dredges.

This dredge will be used to maintain small harbors and inlets with beneficial reuse of the sand for beach restoration. It is a step up from their smaller Ellicott dredge, a Series 670 model named the “COD FISH,” which Barnstable has reliably operated for over 20 years.

Barnstable requested several customized features, including an integrated spud carriage, which allows for better positioning and therefore more precise and efficient cutting. Additionally, the dredge has a raked bow and tow points, which allow for convenient low-drag towing. The dredge is capable of being lifted once fully assembled, and was customized for Barnstable’s crane to allow the dredge to be launched by crane rather than a slipway.

14" Bay Dragon Dredge Specs

Other new features of the Bay Dragon Series include:

  • Tier 3 compliant marine engine
  • Inline drive train with a marine transmission
  • A new hydraulic system, designed in-house, that reduces power and fuel consumption by approximately 10% and increases operating efficiency by 20%.
  • Modern electric over hydraulic control system using Parker IQAN for increased reliability.
  • Easy-to-use joystick controls mounted in the operator’s control chair

State of Ohio

Ellicott will supply two fully customized booster pump stations for the State of Ohio. These

An Ellicott Booster Pump Station

An Ellicott Booster Pump Station

boosters will be used to support the multiple state-owned Ellicott 460SL swinging ladder dredges. They are equipped with remote wireless automation and a monitoring station for use on the dredges.

Features of the booster pumps include:

  • 12” L-36 hard iron dredge pump with adjustable liner
  • Caterpillar Engine – 540 HP (400 kW), bio-diesel compatible
  • Inline marine gear transmission
  • Double-walled fuel tank
  • Local analog gauges and controls
  • Advanced controls and vibration monitoring system

Ellicott is the leading provider of innovative dredging systems and solutions to meet their customers’ needs.

Leadership Changes at Ellicott Dredge Enterprises

Effective October 27, 2016

The Board of Directors of Ellicott Dredge Enterprises (EDE) of Baltimore, MD is pleased to announce two promotions:

Heiko U. Osterchrist is now President of EDE. Most recently he had been Managing Director of Rohr International Holdings and Rohr/Idreco operations in the U.S.A., Germany, France and Holland. Osterchrist has over 35 years of experience in international sales and business development.

ell-news-2016-10-31-01

Heiko Osterchrist, President, EDE

 

He was on the Board of Directors of Ellicott from 2002 to 2009, and joined Ellicott full time as Vice President in 2011. In that capacity he spearheaded the acquisition of EDE’s three European-based ventures: Rohr GMBH in Mannheim, Germany; Rohr France Srl in Betting, France (maker of bucket ladder and clamshell dredgers for sand mining); and IDRECO BV in Doetinchem, The Netherlands. Idreco has developed market leading technology for deep digging dredges for applications in sand mining, mine tailings, and hydroelectric dam desiltation.

 

Prior to joining Ellicott, Osterchrist was a Partner in U.S. Concrete Products, LLC of Baltimore, and Managing Director of ITC Inc. of Baltimore, which mined and distributed industrial and specialty minerals worldwide. He graduated with a BA from Randolph-Macon College.

 

Craig A. Murdock has been promoted to Chief Operating Officer of EDE. Murdock has over 30 years of experience in quality and operations.

ell-news-2016-10-31-02

Craig Murdock, COO, EDE

He was hired by Ellicott as Q.A. Manager in 2010. Murdock was appointed Director of Corporate Process Improvement in 2013 for Ellicott Dredges of Baltimore and Ellicott Dredge Technologies of New Richmond, Wisconsin. He was promoted to General Manager of Ellicott in 2014 and is responsible for manufacturing, engineering, and materials while continuing oversight of process improvements for both of EDE’s U.S. locations. Prior to joining Ellicott, Murdock was the Q.A. Manager and then promoted to General Manager at Command Technology, a supplier of military and commercial aerospace systems.

Peter Bowe, previously President and CEO of EDE, will continue as CEO, and remain on its Board. He will focus on business development and strategic opportunities, as well as supporting key corporate relationships.

Marty Barnes, formerly COO, will continue as SVP focusing on IT and Customer Service projects through at least 2017.

Bowe said: “After 31 years of leading Ellicott Dredges, it is very gratifying for me to announce a new leadership cohort, all developed internally. And we are pleased that Marty Barnes will continue to offer us and our clients his unparalleled experience after a career already spanning over 50 years long with Ellicott. I look forward to the next stage of Ellicott’s success.”

Ellicott also announced that U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker has just appointed Bowe to the U.S. Commerce Department Trade Finance Advisory Council. The purpose of the Council, according to the Department of Commerce, is to advise the Secretary on private sector trade financing for U.S. exporters and to identify effective ways to expand access to finance for them, especially small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and their foreign buyer clients. The Department of Commerce selected just 20 members for the Council nationally.