Category Archives: Lake Dredging

Ellicott Swinging Dragon Busy in Indiana

Superior Dredging of Illinois has announced that their Fall 2017 dredge projects on Jimmerson Lake, Indiana, are underway.

The work, conducted by their brand new Ellicott Swinging Dragon Dredge Jenny-Kay, started at Site 1 by the dam on West Bachelor Road last week. It will continue its work on the channel towards the east. This area is expected to take 3 weeks to complete.

From there, work will move down to the south end of the lake for three separate projects. Next up, will be the nearly silted in channel along Lane 101D referred to as Site 8. From there, the Site 7 channel fronting the Jimmerson Bluffs area along Lane 205AA will be restored.

The final project will be restoring the area in front of the Hilltop Park subdivision.

With over 25,000 cubic yards of sediment to be removed at the 4 different locations on the lake. Work is expected to last six to seven weeks and will continue every day until complete.

The Site 1 & 7 projects were made possible through a majority funding via the Indiana DNR and their Lake and River Enhancement (LARE) program, along with a 20% contribution from the Jimmerson Lake Association.

The Site 8 and Hilltop Park projects, are being privately funded by their respective group of homeowners.

 

Source: DredgingToday

State of Ohio Dredge Fleet Sets Performance Record

OHIO, USA – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) recently finished the 2016 dredging season, having removed more than 1 million cubic yards (apprx. 765,000 m3) of dredged material from state park lakes and other state properties. The State’s dredge fleet consists primarily of Ellicott Model 460SL swinging ladder dredges.

The 1 million cubic yards of sediment is the most that has ever been removed in the history of the state’s dredging program.

Ellicott 460SL dredge, “BRUTUS”

ODNR Director, James Zehringer, attributes ODNR’s dredging success to the dedicated staff and the strategic use of available resources, which serves to improve boater access and water quality.

“ODNR remains committed to improving access to Ohio’s lakes and understands the vital role healthy waters play in all of Ohio’s communities,” Zehringer said. “Our comprehensive approach to dredging utilizes personnel and equipment in a manner that helps create safer waterways for boaters while working to provide cleaner lakes for Ohioans.”

Ellicott 460SL Swinging Ladder Dredge, “CHIEF”, with 1965 Ellicott dredge, “INDIAN”, in the background

In 2016, ODNR and private groups worked together to excavate and remove sediment from navigable waterways, including Buckeye Lake, Grand Lake St. Marys and Indian Lake. This practice increases navigability and water quality by removing phosphorus-rich sediment and increasing water depth.

ODNR dredgers removed enough material from Ohio’s lakes this year to fill 67,431 dump trucks, and if those dump trucks were lined up bumper to bumper, they would stretch 319 miles.

“CONFLUENCE”, another 460SL dredge

Buckeye Lake had a record year of dredging with 293,228 cubic yards being removed, which beat the 2015 record of 139,000 cubic yards. Grand Lake St. Marys also experienced a record-breaking year for removing dredged material by taking out 405,523 cubic yards of sediment, exceeding the 2015 record of 364,590 cubic yards.

Indian Lake removed 100,054 cubic yards of dredged material, also beating the 2015 record of 90,405 cubic yards. The area will likely see another increase next year, as Indian Lake will add another dredge during the 2017 season, ODNR said.

Other dredging sites included East Harbor, Findley, Lake Loramie and Rocky Fork state parks.

The next dredging season will begin in April 2017.

Source: ODNR

Tappan Lake Dredging Begins with Ellicott 370 Dragon Dredge

lake-dredgerHARRISON COUNTY, OH (USA) – The dredging of parts of Tappan Lake have finally begun with the equipment actually in place and on the water, according to Barbara Bennett, director of administrative services for the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District (MWCD).

The matter was discussed at last Friday’s monthly meeting, which was held at Mansfield’s Charles Mill Lake Park.

Bennett stated that 400,000 cubic yards of sediment would be removed from the bottom of Tappan, which would take place near Beaverdam Run Bay, Clear Fork Bay and along both sides of Deersville Road.

The silt is to be vacuumed through flexible pipeline, which will cross under U.S. 250 to a site MWCD owns, which is at the northwest corner of Addy Road and U.S. 250, according to Bennett.

The big blue and white machine with a large orange fixture was given the name “CADIZ,” she said and added that the dewatering racks and basins were set up at the Addy property.

“The dewatering system is by mechanical means and state of the art systems,” Bennett stated by email. She said that using the pumping system would cut down on truck traffic, which would normally be used in hauling away the sediment. The dewatering system, which had been discussed in a previous MWCD meetings, is a system, which dries out the sediment much quicker, allowing recipients of the material to use it sooner than normal.

“We’re having ongoing discussions with Harrison County and also…ODNR (Ohio Department of Natural Resources),” Bennett said. “Nothing [has] been finalized but we will have over 400,000 cubic yards of material so there’s good material available for fill or use somewhere.”

Harrison County Commissioner, Don Bethel, stated the same that they were still discussing the matter with the MWCD and that they were still very interested in obtaining some of that sediment being pulled up from the lake.

Bethel had stated in a previous meeting earlier in the year that one idea for acquiring the sediment would be for use in filling the many small valleys near Industrial Park Road. The idea is to flatten out more land in order for the area to be even more attractive to prospective businesses, which have begun springing up there already.

Ohio DNR: New Rules for Buckeye Lake

Buckeye-Lake-dredgingIn an effort to increase safety awareness and promote recreational opportunity at Buckeye Lake, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is altering its boating rules for Buckeye Lake while it is being managed at a winter pool elevation.

ODNR has designated and will properly mark a specific Speed Zone area on the western portion of the lake to allow boaters to operate their powercraft at greater than idle speed.

“No question, Buckeye Lake will be a gem in the state of Ohio once a new dam is in place, but I want to remind everyone that the lake is still open for business,” said ODNR Director James Zehringer.

Dredging activity has increased on Buckeye Lake as well, and areas of active dredging will be properly labeled by floating markers. Boaters are advised to follow best boating safety practices and properly wear an approved life jacket at all times while on the water.

Source: DredgingToday.com

Ellicott Dredge Leads Gulf of Mexico Marsh Restoration for BP Spill Recovery in Louisiana

dredge-marsh-restorationThe Lake Hermitage Marsh Creation – NRDA Early Restoration Project involves the creation of marsh within a project footprint known as the “Lake Hermitage Marsh Creation Project” developed for and funded through the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) Program. This project substitutes approximately 104 acres of created brackish marsh for approximately 5-6 acres of earthen terraces that would otherwise have been constructed within the CWPPRA project boundary.

The Lake Hermitage Marsh Creation – NRDA Early Restoration Project will create approximately 104 acres of brackish marsh in lieu of the 7,300 linear feet of earthen terraces that was included in the final design of the base CWPPRA project. This additional marsh area will be constructed entirely within the base CWPPRA project’s terrace boundary. Sediment will be hydraulically dredged from a borrow area in the Mississippi River, and pumped via pipeline to create new marsh in the project area. Over time, natural dewatering and compaction of dredged sediments should result in elevations within the intertidal range which would be conducive to the establishment of emergent marsh. The 104-acre fill area will be planted with native marsh vegetation to accelerate benefits to be realized from this project.

The Lake Hermitage Marsh Creation – NRDA Early Restoration Project is located within the Barataria Hydrologic Basin in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, to the west of the community of Pointe a la Hache, and northwest of the community of Magnolia. This basin was identified as a priority area for coastal restoration, and has been the focus of extensive study and project design and implementation.

Source:  noaa.gov

Lavon Lake dredging project adds to North Texas water supply

Even as drought lingers and intensifies across the region, the North Texas Municipal Water District will begin dredging two areas of its key reservoir in the next few months, allowing the utility to increase water deliveries by up to 7.2 million gallons a day. An Ellicott 370 Dragon dredge is being used for this project.

lake-dredging-ranger

The $1.9 million project will remove about 10 feet of accumulated silt around two of the three water intake pipes at Lavon Lake, district spokeswoman Denise Hickey said.

The current water level at Lavon is about 480 feet above sea level. But during the heat of summer, the level can fall 5 to 10 feet through increased usage and evaporation. If the lake level falls to 469 feet, Raw Water Pump 3 would no longer be able to pump water from the lake, Hickey said; at 470 feet, Raw Water Pump 2 would be in the same situation.

“Those are the critical elevations,” she said.

The only remedy then would be bringing in submersible pumps and placing them in the deepest parts of the lake to keep water flowing to the district’s 1.6 million customers, Hickey said.

“You’ll still get water,” she said, “but it isn’t the preferable way.”

The water district approved the dredging project this month and directed the contractor to begin work within 60 days, she said, and Dredge America intends to start as soon as it can.

“They have to do all the staging, getting everything ready,” Hickey said. “My understanding is there are very few pieces of dredging equipment available. And the lake level has to be low enough for them to work. If we get too much rain [in early spring], it makes it difficult to work.”

At this point, Dredge America plans to begin work the week of March 9, Hickey said, and the dredge should be on site by the end of February.

The district is doing similar work at a second reservoir, a $1.8 million project at Jim Chapman Lake, which supplies both the North Texas Municipal Water District and the city of Irving with water.

“Chapman should be finished sometime around the end of summer,” Hickey said.

Five years of drought conditions have exposed broad swaths of dry sand along Lavon’s edges and snaking channels of deeper water through the boggy lake bottom in Lavon’s northern arms. But launching a wide-scale dredging project to deepen the entire lake creates huge environmental problems.

When the district calculated some numbers during drought conditions in 2005-2007, dredging to even modestly increase the lake’s capacity would have produced enough dredge spoils “to cover all of Rockwall County in 3 feet of sediment,” Hickey said.

“And the cost would have been 20 times higher than using any of our other sources of water.”

Source: The Dallas Morning News

Duncan Seawall Completes Sawgrass Lake Dredging

Duncan Seawall Dock and Boat Lift recently completed an 18 month, 200,000 cubic-yard hydraulic dredge project as a sub-contractor to Woodruff & Son’s Construction (Bradenton, Florida) for the Southwest Florida Management District at Sawgrass Lake in St. Petersburg, Florida. lake-dredging-duncan-seawall

This sensitive hydraulic dredge project with partially contaminated material required Duncan Seawall to dredge the lake from -2 to -8 feet and required the use of one of its Ellicott hydraulic dredges.

This machine was sized to match the dewatering and material separation plants located adjacent to the lake.

Duncan Seawall specializes in all types of dredge applications using its hydraulic or mechanical dredge equipment and shoreline stabilization projects.

Source: Dredging Today