Tag Archives: beach dredging

Cavache-MAYA CAELYN 1170

Little Known Ways to Nourish a Coastline

Ponce de Leon Inlet, FL– Crews have been granted permission by the U.S. Army Corps of Army Engineers (USACE) to begin dredging on the Ponce de Leon Inlet.  This should make it more secure for anglers to navigate. In addition, the dredging will offer additional beach nourishment for the nearby coastline. The Inlet itself has not been maintained to this extent in over ten years according to the Corps officials.

Those working on the project have already begun the mobilization phase of the eight-month-long hydraulic dredging project.  In fact, crew members working on the project are expected to remove nearly 38,000 ft² (3,530 m²) of sand and debris. The dredging should increase water depths to nearly 12 ft (3.65 m). The USACE is financing the and has awarded Cavache (Incorporated) of Pompano Beach the contract.

What’s in a Dredge

The team from Cavache Inc,  (owned and operated by Mr. Adam Adache and Mr. Anthony Cavo), has over 100 years of combined hydraulic dredging experience.  They have previously worked on similar types of projects such as the Florida Inland District project. The team from Cavache will be using an Ellicott 1170 “Dragon” dredge known as the “Maya Caelyn” to complete the project.

The portable cutterhead dredge is a medium sized dredge that is designed to perform exceptionally well in typical conditions experienced in Atlantic inlets, and entrance channels from the Sea to inner coastal waterways.

Ponce de Leon Project Details

“What is really unique about this specific project is that this is an offshore disposal placement project that requires pumping material offshore. The pumping distances are fairly lengthy, and our team is using multiple boosters to complete the project,” noted Cavache Principle Owner Anthony Cavo.

Debris and sand that accumulated during Hurricanes Irma and Matthew caused aggressive shoaling.  Also, the materials caused by the shoaling will be pumped from the Ponce de Leon Inlet.  The materials will then be transported to a nearby location and used to help nourish area beaches.  Once the dredging process is complete the flow of water will drastically improve in the nearby region. Dredging the inlet should bolster the shoreline during subsequent storms making it simple for vessels to freely move about the inlet.

Blocked Water Channel

Getting Rid of a Blocked Water Channel Once and For All

Tilghman Island Rich History

Tilghman Island is nestled in the heart of Talbot County, Maryland. Formerly referred to as the “Great Choptank Island,” the island is only 3 miles long (4.83 kms) and a 1 mile (1.60 kms) wide.  According to historians, the first English settlers arrived over 360 years ago in 1656.

During the early 19th century, two parcels of land were sold to a group of oysterman. The group wanted the land for its close proximity to the prime harvesting grounds that surround Tilghman Island.  Today, over 1,000 thousand residents live on the island. A majority of the residence make their living by crabbing, fishing, and oyster or seafood packing.

Tilghman Island Worst Nightmare – A Blocked Water Channel

Throughout the its recent history, severe thunderstorms and eroding waterways have caused sediment, clay, mud, silt, sand, and shells to build up, blocking  the Knapps Narrows access channel to the Choptank River. Consequently, the Knapps not only shortens the route around the end of the island by over five miles (8kms), it is the home port for dozens of fishing and crabbing vessels. In some locations, depths have been reported as low as a 1 foot (0.30m) during low tide.

The blocked channel is preventing Tilghman Island businesses from thriving.  Several business owners have lost nearly 50 percent of their business.  Ron Cicero, the owner of Tilghman Island Marina and Rentals, said that the impact has been felt by everyone. “Restaurants and tourism on the island have declined dramatically over the years.” Cicero also added that boaters and tourists  are staying away from the island because of the blocked channel.  With so many declining businesses struggling to survive the local economy has suffered.  As a result, residents took matters into their own hands, and started searching for answers to their problems several months ago.

WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 –

Solution to the Problem—Hydraulic Dredging

Residence can now breathe a sigh of relief. The US Army Corp of Engineers in conjunction with various branches of the Federal Government, Maryland State Government, Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Talbot County government have agreed to allow crews to dredge approximately 100,000 cubic yd3 (914,40 m3) of material.

Workers are using an Ellicott Series 970 Dragon Dredge to clear the channel. The Hydraulic dredge is ideal for this specific job.  To summarize things, the dredeges’ cutterhead  will remove the debris found in the river.  The dredge will then pump the discharge efficiently to a distant location. In fact, we are already a week into dredging, and crews have dropped a blue pipeline on the west side of the Choptank River. Now the dredges are sucking up dirt and water – pumping it out of the river to a nearby farm.

The project is expected to cost approximately $1.4 million and will be done by Memorial Day weekend.